Homeschool Series: Space

Standard

I’ve always wanted to have a designated “school room” in our house but believed that with our completely open floor plan, it just wasn’t possible.  When William was the only one doing schoolwork, we used the dining room table.  When we added Louis a couple years ago, he and I often worked on the floor, the couch, or at a little art table.  But this year, with two new kindergarteners and an exponentially growing library of children’s books and teacher’s manuals, I was really longing for more space and getting tired of looking at the alphabet and the “Today’s Weather” poster every time we sat down for a meal.

I thought about what I wanted–four separate spaces for dining, relaxing, home office work, and school.  The school room needed to accommodate the three younger students, and one of the other rooms needed to double as a space for William to work without distraction.  But I definitely did not want school to take over all the common areas of our home, as it was threatening to.

After looking at several homeschooling friends’ homes that had a separate room for school, I realized I did have the space for those four “rooms,” just not the walls.  We could use furniture or rugs to create a boundary for each room.  So with a little rearranging, we successfully separated our home into a school/ playroom,

Image

Home office

Image

Dining room (still need to get those alphabet cards down)

Image

and cozy living room.  We had the couches in the back playroom before.  It’s much nicer to be able to turn out the lights on school and relax away from all that in the evenings.

Image

William’s desk fits unobtrusively in here, and he can read in peace.  This kid gets so many hours a day to read–his mama is very jealous. 🙂

Image

Someone was hoping to avoid the camera!

The school room is sunny and cheery in the mornings, and the Weather Frog is no longer staring me down at dinner.

Image

Louis, Ben, and Marie each have their own desk and crate.

Image

Image

Teddy has space to make a sort-of contained mess.

Image

Kids’ books

Image

My books

Image

My inspiration shelf

Image

Book basket for this week’s storytime

Image

Table for working with things we want to keep out of the baby’s hands–art, board games, puzzles, and math manipulatives.

Image

Two weeks ago I was moping about having a “too-small” house for homeschooling.  It’s amazing what a little moving things around can accomplish.  And, throwing things away.  We got rid of several boxes of unread books, broken toys, and general clutter.  We didn’t have to buy anything except the crates, and suddenly it seems like we have so much room for homeschooling!

This post is part of Micaela’s homeschooling series, and her post on organization was a huge inspiration to me to make better use of our space.  Look for part 2 on scheduling after we’ve been at it another week or so.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Homeschool Series: Space

  1. Lindsey

    I love it!! I wish we could do the same. Maybe there is a way…but I don’t feel motivated to move anything around right now! I am pleased and thankful that we at least have a few different little desks and tables that the kids can spread out to if needed.

  2. Oh. My. Gosh. Catherine, you are TOTALLY inspiring me!!! I am still unhappy with the way our homeschooling is going based on the location and having to bring materials from the playroom/future homeschool room to the dining room. Your home is amazingly laid out! I kind of wish I had a blueprint of your house so I could visualize the whole space better. But maybe that would seem a bit stalker-ish? Hee hee.

    One very important question: where did you get your low tables/desks? I have been planning to buy them for my kids for awhile but all I can find are new ones at Lakeshore and they cost almost $200!!!

    • Thanks Micaela! The tables and desks were all gifted to us over the years; one came from a homeschooling family whose children had grown up. I think one of the tables came from Wal-Mart (not surprisingly it is the one that is falling apart) and cost a little over $100.

      Our house is shaped sort of like a capital L, with both lines the same length. Maybe I should draw a diagram. 🙂

Comments are closed.