Learning Notes for Week of February 9

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Monday, February 9

A rare morning where I woke up and realized I had several errands and phone calls that had to be completed that morning. I almost never take off school to do such things, but I’d forgotten a couple really important things on Saturday and that was that.

Louis was away all day at N.’s school doing another trial day. So, it doesn’t matter who’s missing, it’s always easier to do an errand with one less child.

We were supposed to go to a co-op activity, but we missed that and showed up in time for William and me to go to confession with our homeschool group and then William to altar serve at noon Mass at our parish.

We had a doctor’s appointment after that and got home late in the afternoon and worn out!

Tuesday, February 10

Mass, then back to co-op, but having done my teaching time, I can now drop the three middle kids off for the rest of year. William did a math test at my friends’ house while we had our Bible study, and after that he played with Teddy and gave him lunch. This morning is a sweet time for him to have a chance to take care of Teddy.

We had a birthday party for one of the kids after co-op, and again got home in the afternoon, all worn out.

In the car, we finished the Arabian Nights and started All-of-a-Kind Family, by Sydney Taylor. This book is like Little House in the Big City–about a Jewish family with 5 daughters in Manhattan at the turn of the 20th century. It’s an engaging story, but the family, especially Mama, is a little too perfect.

The kids did their reading/listening to literature time and then started making valentines for a party coming up on Friday. They each were supposed to bring 60!!  And we were planning to make most of them.

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Wednesday, February 10

This was a hard day. William and Louis took the entire morning to complete their math assignments, and I realized too late they just had too much to do.

I also notice we have a pattern of having hard days on Wednesdays. We are most of us introverts here and after church all day on Sunday, and co-op activities most Mondays and Tuesdays, it’s no wonder we are cranky on Wednesdays.

The bright spots today were reading from the Old Testament and A Letter to Mrs. Roosevelt. Also, Ben finished the first level of All About Spelling. Now all three of them are in Level 2, and I am going to start doing their spelling altogether. It’s the only way I can fit it in every day.

William started working on some questions from his Story of the World chapter on the Irish Potato Famine. I knew the English were nasty to the Irish, but I didn’t know how nasty. I didn’t know the English made the Irish load up their good crops on ships bound for England even though the Irish were starving. William was pretty mad about this too.

Thursday, February 12

I changed our morning format a bit today, and it helped everyone wake up and work more diligently (me too). After Mass, we started altogether in our school room with our Latin hymn and I resurrected the states & capitols song we were learning at the beginning of the year. We’ve only memorized through Nevada, so we can pick this back up again.

Then I took everyone but William out into the dining room so we wouldn’t be so distracting to him. Teddy got some math manipulatives to play with in his high chair and I did math and handwriting with the three middle kids at the table. I assigned less math to Louis, and he was happy about that. Ben and Marie finished their workbook (Singapore 1A) and are set to start 1B next week. We’re halfway through the school year now, so that’s about right. William also hit the halfway mark in his math book.

Handwriting and copywork and then everyone had to go outside for a break. I read the newspaper for a few minutes.

Spelling with the three kids together, and then each one read to me while the others played with Teddy or played outside. William was still working slowly through math, but as he consistently gets an A on his tests every 10 lessons I will cut his assignment a little more.

William and I reviewed his grammar section on nouns and looked up how to diagram the possessive case–nouns that act as adjectives. And he is wondering if there are more noun cases than the ones he has learned. A quick Google search reminded me that the possessive case is also called the genitive case, and that is a more accurate name (Mozart’s music means the music originated with Mozart not that Mozart owns the music). Of course genitive means origin, William points out–the book of Genesis.

At lunch we read from A Letter to Mrs. Roosevelt and they asked if a First Lady can make laws–so had a little discussion about her role and since it’s always good to try to find common ground, I mentioned Mrs. Obama’s initiatives to get kids to eat healthy, grow vegetables, and exercise. We can all agree on that.

After lunch I turned on a Charlie Brown DVD about the Wright Brothers. Everybody loved that. Then Teddy went down for a nap, and William and I watched his Latin lesson. This lesson answered his questions about more noun cases. What his grammar book calls the objective case his Latin book breaks into ablative, accusative, and dative. Thankfully he and I both find grammar extremely interesting. 🙂

Also read this Saint Valentine bio by Ann Tompert in the evening.

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Friday, February 13

Math facts and handwriting right after breakfast, then a homeschool Valentine’s party at the roller skating rink.

In the afternoon the kids watched the Charlie Brown Valentines movie and made valentines for each other.

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William made cookies for his siblings.

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Teddy loved his “valentimes.”

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More homeschool days at Melanie’s!

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2 thoughts on “Learning Notes for Week of February 9

    • Oh, we really love it. 🙂 I can’t say William relishes doing grammar workbook exercises but definitely talking about it and understanding how it works. My one bone to pick with the Charlotte Mason tradition is how it undervalues grammar. I am learning that English grammar does make more sense when studied alongside a more structured language like Latin.

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